Adidas Terrex Trailcross Protect MTB shoe

I’ve long been a fan of flat pedals when riding. Over the years, I’ve ridden in running shoes, work boots, skate shoes and finally going bike specific a few years ago, Five Tens for a long time. Back in June, I needed a new set of shoes and wanted to try something new. I also wanted something understated and basically black, which proved quite hard to find; there is a lot of lairy kit out there at the moment!
However, after a bit of searching, I stumbled across the Adidas Terrex Trailcross range, and the hi-top ‘protect’ version caught my eye immediately. All black, save for a few striking white lines, there’s no question that these shoes look the absolute business.
Let’s start with construction and materials. The high-top features the ever-reliable stealth rubber sole found on Five Ten shoes (who are part of the Adidas group), D3O ankle protection, ripstop upper, a simple yet effective lace bungee and Ortholite midsoles, ensuring all day comfort.
For those that don’t like the high-top feel of a riding shoe, there’s a low top SL version available which has pretty much the same features.
The look and feel of the Trailcross shoes is, as you’d expect from Adidas, exceptional. Lightweight (the ‘460’ on the ankle is the actual weight per shoe – mine are a UK 9.5 and this is spot on within sizing being true) and comfortable to slip your foot into, they’ve thought of some important factors for a mountain biker. You put a huge amount of pressure through your legs when riding, so Adidas have gone with their Ortholite midsole which really does provide some incredible support when riding. I’ve had some long and dirty days on the bike and not once have my feet felt sore, which has happened in the past with other shoes.
Another great thing they’ve thought of is that we move our feet around when riding and occasionally ankles meet metal. So, a useful D3O pad placed on the Velcro strap of each shoe is a welcome addition and has absolutely saved me some hits over the past 5 months. There’s also a reinforced heel and a little bit of protection for your toes.
My favourite little touch is the lace bungee. I’m absolutely in love with this feature. All too many times in the past have I been riding and laces come loose and flail towards the drivetrain. This, as I’m sure you know, can result in bad things happening and can also interrupt a great ride if you’re in the zone. Not once has this failed me and I’m very happy for this.
The sole isn’t quite a sticky as my Five Ten Freeriders, but I’m quite happy with this as sometimes I felt almost clipped in when paired with my DMR Vaults. However, with the Trailcross shoes, whilst incredibly grippy, there is a little room for movement, meaning you can angle your feet to mimic the direction and flow of the trail. They’ve found the Goldilocks equivalent of sole stiffness too; not too hard, not too soft, just perfect.
Another side note of the sole (and the shoes as a whole) is that they can double as trail walking shoes. I tried this with a hike around Lands End and the Cornish Coastal Path recently and they held up perfectly. The sole has angled lugs which really do grip into both walking paths and when hiking back up to the top of a trail with the bike.
Whilst the Trailcross may look waterproof, they’re sadly not, but that’s why Sealskinz exist. They do repel a lot of water though and also dry extremely quickly, which I found out with a recent trip to Bikepark Wales.. mud, slop and water and my feet still felt relatively dry by the end of the day.
From racing to big trail centres, local rides to hiking, I’ve honestly given these shoes some abuse over the past few months and have only had to chuck them in the wash once to get them back to new. Usually a quick brush down is sufficient to get them looking great again. Even after some hideous treatment, the Trailcross shoes still look like new.
These are genuinely the comfiest shoes I’ve ever ridden with, so I find it strange that I’ve not seen another set being worn on the trails yet! Light, protective and next-generation comfort all at a great price (mine were from Germany so I paid in €, but you can get them for around £100), these should one hundred percent be a consideration for your next trail shoe.
My only grumble with the Adidas Trailcross Protect shoes is that I don’t have a second pair; they’re that good.
Until next time, cheers.
Ian @ Stealth Riders
www.adidas.com

Hope HB160

I mean, just look it at.

Hope are known for making some beautiful components, that’s widely known and accepted. For their first foray into building a frame, they’ve done it again; the HB160 is truly a jaw-dropping work of art that wouldn’t look out of place if it was hung on a wall of a billionaire’s summer mansion in the Hamptons. The sheer time and effort that has gone into making this bike a reality is difficult to comprehend, but some things are most definitely worth the wait and my word have Hope delivered the goods. This post is going to be picture heavy and for damn good reason.
There’s no doubt this bike is visually stunning, so the question on a lot of people’s minds is, how does it ride? As Hope are only producing 500 bikes per year and with a price tag of a cool £7500, this boutique beauty is out of reach for a large percentage of cyclists, myself included. However, I have some very kind friends at Nirvana Cycles in Westcott who just happen to have a demo bike with the even more exclusive ‘factory green’ colourway, and they asked if I’d like to tag along on one of their shop rides and try out the HB160… naturally I was like a puppy raised on cocaine and kibble and jumped at the chance.
So let’s take a look at the bike I’d be riding:
  • Frame: HB160 Carbon, 160mm travel, Horst link suspension platform
  • Shock: Fox Factory Float X2, 160mm travel
  • Fork: Fox 36 Float Factory RC2, 160mm travel
  • Wheels: Hope 35W rims, Hope Pro4 HB/110mm hubs, Maxxis High Roller 2 3C EXO 27.5×2.4in tyres
  • Drivetrain: Hope cranks, Hope cassette, SRAM XX1 shifter and mech
  • Brakes: Hope Tech 3 E4, 180/180mm
  • Components: Hope Carbon bar 780mm, Hope AM 35mm stem, Hope lock-on grips, SDG Duster Ti saddle, RockShox Reverb seatpost and lever
  • Weight: ~31lbs
You can check out behind the scenes video from the Barnoldswick based team here:
 As Hope have the benefit of using their components on the bike, they have created some of their own ‘standards’; a 130mm rear hub spacing (‘anti-boost’, if you will) which still gives insane strength, a 17mm rear axle and a unique bottom bracket setup are just a few ‘non-conformist’ additions. However, you can rest assured that, should you break anything or need a replacement, Hope will be able to sort it.
The HB160 was waiting for me on arrival on a sunny Saturday morning and I met with shop owner Simon and buddy Neil and I got the bike set up; a little extra pressure in the forks and shock and it was ready to roll on a shop ride with some great people around the Leith Hill area of the Surrey Hills. I’ve never really ridden this area, as I’ve always stuck more to the Peaslake side historically. After the ride I did, I am absolutely going to explore that area more, it’s brilliant and has a huge variety of trails from Whistler style tech to road gaps, massive drops and monster senders.


PG going HUGE on a road gap.

I tested a large and, at 6’1”, the bike felt a little more compact that I’d have expected, positioning me a bit more over the front wheel than I was used to. However, the HB160 is a bike that was designed to tackle the climbs and long days in the saddle just as much as the descents. Hell, it’s a British bike and we don’t really do uplifts as much as the rest, so I’m sure Hope had this in mind during the design process.
I was out with a great group; Simon, the shop owner was leading the way and buddy and team rider Phil was on fire as always, sending anything in his path (and taking some great photos). I also met some great people, amongst others: Will (who had the gnarliest crash I’ve seen for a long time, which he thankfully came out of with minor scrapes), Kate, a hella fast shredder with the best shorts I’ve ever seen and Miles, a friend of another team rider Charlie and a rapid little dude!
We did a roughly 10 mile loop taking in just under 2000ft, across various terrain, so I felt I got a great test of the HB160.
THE RIDE:
The climbs were a cinch, the only time I had to put a foot down was due to my shocking line choice over some roots. Otherwise, it would climb like a true mountain goat thanks to the supremely crisp shifting of the Hope cassette and SRAM XX1 shifter working in perfect harmony.
Descending technical singletrack is, in my mind, where the HB160 truly came alive. The grip the bike delivered was astounding. Where I’d usually pick a line carefully through roots, the HB160 genuinely drifted over the top of everything, as if it was dancing on water; the combination of wide tyres with low pressure, a responsive back end and the geometry positioning me perfectly all came together to produce the most grip I’ve experienced when riding, and I genuinely mean it when I say that.
General riding of the HB160 was great fun too. It felt reliable, trustworthy and above all, energetic. I found the HB160 was easy to get on the back wheel and hop over little features on a trail.
We rode some decent sized jumps and drops and the HB160 swallowed them whole, with the Fox shocks absorbing everything with no question, one or two times the plush 160mm of travel compensating for a few simple, sloppy mistakes. Twisting and turning through the trees on loam dusted trails, the HB160 felt like a jacked-up Honey Badger; compact, rowdy and full of rage just waiting to be unleashed. Small bumps turned into an excuse to get the bike airborne and any slight angle in the trail had me flicking the back end out in search for hero dirt.
One small thing I was particularly impressed with were the Hope grips. The black colour almost became transparent and whilst they looked thin to begin with, they felt supremely comfortable and the knurled construction together with the slight ridge on the outer end of the grip ensured my hands felt perfectly placed throughout the ride.
However, the main thing that had me in awe all day was just how refined the bike was. From the carbon weave glistening when hit by a beam of light through the trees, to the meticulous machining on the swingarm, the design of the bike has been thought through in an almost incomprehensible way. The curves on the frame are glorious and every detail has been covered; it truly is a masterpiece of design.
The handling of the bike just increases the ‘wow’ factor of the HB160 too. Snappy, sharp and ultra-responsive, it was an absolute joy to ride and I’m hugely thankful to Nirvana cycles (Neil in particular for organising it) for allowing me to ride this beast of a bike. The shop rides are superb fun with a great vibe and shop owner Simon took the time to offer some great advice to some of the newer riders which was great to see. Even better, the ride ends with a curry back at the shop; a great way to get your energy back for the day ahead!

I only experienced a couple of downsides with the HB160 during my ride; firstly, the Reverb was very slow at returning to its extended position, even after fettling with the speed. Secondly, as I felt a bit more compact on the bike than I was used to, I would have loved a little extra width in the bars. An 800mm bar rather than a 780mm would have been preferable, but both of these are easily rectified, so neither would be a show stopper when considering a purchase.
OVERALL:
I actually struggled to write this review as it’s hard to convey how impressive the HB160 was in words. It’s perhaps because I felt a bit humbled riding this bike; if I’m honest, it was almost like letting a gibbon drive a Formula One car.
The HB160 is an exceptional bike, made by the best. It’s no surprise that it comes at a premium, but then you’d not expect to pay peanuts for a McLaren or an Aston Martin, would you? If you’re lucky enough to have the budget for this one, you simply must test one and you cannot go wrong with a shop ride with Nirvana Cycles to put it through its paces.
I’m off to put one of my kidneys on eBay, I’ll catch you soon.
Cheers,
Ian @ Stealth Riders
https://www.hopetechhb.com/
I took a huge amount of photos, so here’s a small gallery to feast your eyes on, including a few shots of the new team jersey (but more on that in a separate post soon):

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Santa Cruz Nomad C review

Peaslake is a small, idyllic village that sits unassumingly in the heart of the Surrey Hills. In this village with a quaint little village store, stunning houses and a great pub, sits a small shop called Pedal & Spoke. For the past 7 years, it’s been the unrivalled powerhouse of the UK Santa Cruz market. Owner Howard Wagstaff is a lovely guy,  known for wearing two things in particular; a welcoming smile and his trademark flip flops. Seriously, even in the depths of Winter, Howard is rocking the open feet look. If 5.10 don’t give him a signature set soon, I’d be surprised.
Supporting Howard is shop mechanic and all-round legend Jack ‘Mouse’ Roadley. Again, Jack is always smiling and having a laugh with the locals and newcomers alike and is always happy to help with anything. He’s a big supporter of Stealth Riders too, so I’m naturally chuffed by this!
Finally, there’s Mags, the shop dawg. A beautiful little Jack Russel, Mags can usually be found chilling out in her bed under one of the counters or near the tees. That is, until she hears the rustle of a paper bag with a cheese straw inside. Ears perk up instantly and the stereotypical ‘puppy dog eyes’ come out. All in all, Pedal & Spoke really is the quintessential ‘local bike shop in the small village’, inclusive of boutique brands and the friendly ‘locals service’ which is extended to all who walk through the door. It’s the perfect location; Surrey is one of the most affluent areas in the UK and the Surrey Hills just so happen to have some of the best trails to ride in the South East of the UK too, so it’s all a match made in heaven. It’s no surprise then, that Pedal & Spoke only sell Santa Cruz bicycles. Affluence demands perfection, so why sell anything else?!
After a quick chat with the guys, I was graced with a Large Santa Cruz Nomad C, the ‘S’ model in the gorgeous Ink/Gold colourway, which sits at a shade under £5k, and was told to simply ‘take it out for as long as you want and enjoy it’. And that’s exactly what I did. 6 hours later, I returned the Nomad, and below is what came of my time with the bike.

The Bike:

Nearly everything has changed with the 2018 Nomad and it really has been redesigned from the ground up. After years of development and research with it’s big brother the V10, Santa Cruz have trickled that tech and design down to the Nomad, to allow what seems to be basically a hill friendly mini DH bike.  I’m pleased to see they have stuck with 27.5″ wheels, too.
Longer and slacker, the 2018 Nomad has a much lower placed shock, passing through the split seat tube. This change allows growth in travel from it’s predecessor, from 165mm to 170mm, and allows the bike to effectively feel the same on the descents as a full-blown downhill bike.
The Mk4 Nomad is a big departure in styling terms from the Mk3 and below is the proof of this. I was accompanied on the day by my buddy Phil G, who just so happens to ride a stealth black Mk3 Nomad. Aesthetically, I genuinely cannot choose a favourite; each has it’s own standout points and are both stunning in their own right, so I’m still torn. You can make your own mind up.

The S model I was demoing on the day is the mid-range offering of the Nomad family, with build highlights below:
Frame: Full carbon
Forks: Rockshox Lyrik RC 170
Shock: Rockshox Super Deluxe R
Drivetrain: SRAM GX Eagle 12 speed
Brakes: SRAM Code R, 180mm rotors F&R
Bar/Stem: Race Face Aeffect with Santa Cruz Grips
Seatpost: Rockshox Reverb, 170mm (L/XL models, smaller models get a shorter drop)
Wheels: 27.5″ E13 TRS 30mm rims with Novatec hubs, boost spacing.
Tyres: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5 Front / Maxxis Minion DHR 2.4 Rear
Weight: Approx 29lbs
The Nomad also comes in an alloy guise, with prices starting at a friendlier £3,599. However, if you’re a bit more flush with cash, you can opt for the carbon ‘Reserve’ model; the Cremé de la créme of the range which will set you back over £7,500. Regardless of the model, the 2018 Nomad really is a joy to look at – sleek lines, stunning colours and that unmistakable classy look of a Santa Cruz bicycle:

The Ride:

It was a bit of a grim day and the rain had been coming in over the few days before, so there was going to be some mud. Phil and I decided to start out by stretching the legs with a road climb up to Holmbury St Mary, the typically drier hill of the three on the day, up to one of the Surrey Hills’ more famous trails; Barry Knows Best (BKB). Like an engine on a cold day, I take a little while to get warmed up and into the swing of things, as I’m sure most of you do too. After a bastard climb up,  the descent of Barry gave me the chance to pump the bike through small dips, test the tyres in the corners and put the power down on the fast sections. Soon enough, I was feeling ready for the more gnarly, technical trails the Surrey Hills is known for.
We rode up towards Pitch Hill and I was very pleasantly surprised with the climb up ‘Deathstar’; if you know it, you’ll be pleased to hear that a 170mm bike can sail up. The rider, not so much.. after clipping a small rock, I was guided into a small gully and my climb came to a halt. Still, if I’d not made that mistake, the climb would have been easy enough. We rode ‘Proper Bo’ to warm up a little more and that gave me the first taste of the Nomad in the air. Whilst it’s a tiny double, it’s still good to get a feel before the bigger stuff, and the bike flew smoothly through the 4-5ft double and landed as if it was a kerb.
Feeling more comfortable on the bike, it was time for something a bit bigger. We rode up to the entrance of Thick & Creamy, known for its super rocky, technical gully entrance, which then opens up to two drops; the first being over a downed oak tree and the second launches you into a huge berm before a smooth table. The Nomad sailed through everything with ease. It was, simply put, the smoothest run of that trail I’ve ever experienced, with travel feeling endless and the wheels feeling railed. I didn’t think I’d ever say that the drops on this trail would feel small, but the Nomad swallowed them without question.

We rode towards Winterfold Forest and the climb there once again surprised me. How the hell is a 170mm bike pedalling this well?! I mean it when I say this, the Nomad felt like a 130-140mm bike on the climbs. We reached a favourite trail of mine (and everybody else), Evian, and again, sailed over the first 8-10ft double, through the tight berms and over the second, smaller double. It was at this point I realised my face was beginning to ache a little. I figured out this was because for the past few hours of riding and chatting, all I’d been doing was smiling and laughing, even as the mud and slop began to cling more to me and the bike. It’s not every day I enjoy a ride this much, so I was not going to take it for granted.
We rode a few more of the trails around the Winterfold area, including Northern Monkey and again, the Nomad never skipped a beat. Not once. Even on greasy roots, as soon as I felt a wheel begin to give, the Nomad shifted into autopilot, ensuring I remained upright and railed. Honestly, it was a strange feeling and I can’t quite explain it; where I’m certain I’d have fallen a few times on another bike, I somehow kept things together on the Nomad, saving me an embrace with some of Surreys finest mud.

One thing I was very curious about in the morning when picking the bike up was, considering the state of the trails and the general muddy conditions the UK has in comparison to California, the position of the rear shock. Surely, with the shock placement so low and close to the rear wheel, this was a recipe for disaster. However, it’s amazing what one tiny piece of plastic can do. This just goes to show that the small details really do make the differences. Not once was I hampered by mud clogging the shock, nor did I feel anything other than buttery smooth compression and rebound. Top marks to Santa Cruz for the innovative ways they’re addressing minor points to ensure maximum stoke levels.

Phil and I headed back to the village centre for a bite to eat and a warm brew, courtesy of the ever-lovely Trudy and team at the Peaslake Village Store. At this point, Phil had to head off. Covered in mud, damp and aching a little, I could at this point have finished the ride. But why quit on a good thing? I was still feeling stoked to be on this bike, so I set off for a full climb to the Holmbury St Mary viewpoint and test through Yoghurt pots; undulating corners, much like a roller coaster made of gnar. At the viewpoint, I bumped into Marcia Ellis, who, a few years ago launched Surrey Hills MTB Chix, a group dedicated for getting women out riding. We had a good chat and it’s awesome to see how far women riding has come and it’s thanks to Marcia and co that are driving the revolution.
I hit Yoghurt Pots and managed to get through most of the trail without pedalling, instead opting to pump through everything I could and the immediate speed generation the Nomad produced was inspiring. It’s always a trail that guarantees a smile from me, and this time I think it was just a touch bigger than ever before.
Finally, I headed back to the first trail of the day, BKB. This time however, I knew the bike and how it handled, so the bike and I worked in unison, nailing every rut, root and berm. I finished the trail feeling elated, yet sad to know my time with the Nomad was coming to a close. I span the last few hundred metres back to the shop, reminiscing on the sheer epicness of the ride I’ve just had, hosed the bike down and hung it back up on the rail outside whilst having a chat to a mate that was at the shop, James B. Thanking Howard and Jack, I said my goodbyes and got changed into some fresh clothes before heading home to reflect on the day.

HUGE thanks to everybody on the day, especially Howard and Jack for the demo and Phil for the company. As always, a big shout out to Trudy for the big smiles and beautiful coffee too and a ‘great to see you’ to Marcia and James. The cycling community is just incredible and consistently friendly, no matter who you are.
Talking quickly on Pedal & Spoke, they are, simply put, THE place to go if you want a Santa Cruz. They have an insane choice of demo bikes to try out, offer an impressive part-exchange service on your old Santa Cruz if you’re eyeing the latest model and provide top service, products and advice, all the time with good laughs.
I mentioned it in the opening paragraphs, but one thing that stood out for me was the level of relationship the guys in the shop had with their customers – from loyal clients turned friends, to new customers looking to buy the latest kit, the service was impeccable, dedicated and truly bespoke to each need. Still, it’s hard to see how the service wouldn’t be anything less than world class… the guys work in the heart of the stunning Surrey countryside with some of the best trails in South East on their doorstep, offering some of the nicest bikes currently available to some incredibly friendly people. Add to this the allure of the best cheese straws in the galaxy.. did somebody say dream job?!

Final Thought:

I was going to write something big here, but I honestly don’t think I need to. Simply put, you know that warm fuzzy feeling you got when you had your first crush? By the last few trails of the day, that’s how the Nomad had me feeling. I think it could be love…
Cheers,
Ian @ Stealth Riders
http://pedalandspoke.co.uk/ 
https://www.santacruzbicycles.com/en-GB/nomad

 

Pivot Switchblade Carbon 27.5+ XT Pro 1x

Ok, so the title is a bit of a mouthful, but Pivot don’t do things by half measures. From the first bike brand to use Di2, to the first to use pressfit bottom brackets, Pivot are always ahead of the curve when knocking out new and unique bikes.
The reason for the long title of this absolutely stunning bike is the sheer option of builds Pivot offer. I was at Swinley Bike Hub recently and they let me loose on this model, which sits in the middle of the range of the carbon models with a few choice upgrades, which sits around the £6k mark. Whilst their latest Mach 5.5 is the talk of the town at the moment, I really wanted to try this one out and once again, the Hub generously sorted me out.
Let’s start off with Pivots very own introduction video:
Now you’ve had a proper introduction, let’s get to it. I tried the 27.5+ variant, but the Switchblade, as the name suggests, can also change to a 29″ Enduro weapon. In the 27.5+ guise, it’s genuinely like riding a bike that, instead of tyres, has octopus tentacles wrapped around some ‘holy crap I’d sell a kidney they’re so nice’ Reynolds carbon wheels with ‘ugggghhhhh’ inducing Industry Nine hubs, which look (and sound) resplendent on a bright Summers day.
The chainstays on the Switchblade are the shortest on the market at a tiny 428mm and, with their huge 157mm ‘Super Boost Plus’ rear hub (usually reserved for DH bikes) and long, low geometry, this bike refuses to let you get sketchy, no matter how hard you try. And trust me, I tried. Swinley Forest has some great hidden trails with some great features that allow you to really test a bike out in all ways, and the Switchblade never missed a beat.
The looks of the bike are downright filthy, with the red and black complementing each other perfectly. Weight, even with plus tyres, is incredibly light, sitting around 28lbs. Here’s some of the standout features:
  • Compatible with both 29 and 27.5+ wheelsizes
  • Fits 27.5+ tires up to 3.25” wide
  • Fits 29er tires up to 2.5” wide
  • Features Pivots new long and low geometry
  • Ultra short 428mm (16.85”) chainstays beat every other bike in the category
  • Front derailleur compatible with Pivot’s stealth E-Type mounting system
  • 135mm dw-link rear suspension with upper clevis and linkage and double wishbone rear triangle
  • Designed for a 150mm fork, fits forks up to 160mm
  • 27.5+ spec’d with 40mm inner width Reynolds carbon wheels and aggressive new Maxxis REKON 2.8 tires
  • Pivot Cable Port system for easy internal routing of shifters, brakes and droppers and full Di2 Integration
The DW link is a tried and tested winner too, with premium brands such as Turner and Ibis also using the same design. It’s evident that any pedal bob disappears and you get an extremely smooth, progressive feeling throughout the stroke. Not only does it work like a charm, it looks great, too.
Whilst I didn’t get too much time on this bike, I genuinely enjoyed every single second. Climbing was a breeze, descending was a dream, hell, even fireroads were fun to ride on the Switchblade, with the hum of the Maxxis Rekon tyres nearly getting you into a meditative state and in the zone before the next trail.
The combination of Fox 36 up front and a custom tuned DPS Evol rear shock are superb additions to an already great bike, which ooze performance at every bump, rut or root. There were times the 135mm of rear travel felt like it needed a little more, but that was only on the bigger features of the off-piste areas.
As above, as I didn’t get to spend as much time as I’d like on this bike, I can’t really give too much detail on specs, geo and everything I’m sure you’re here to read, but what I can tell you is this; the Pivot Switchblade, whilst expensive, is truly a ‘rip the lips off of your face’ fun bike to ride. Granted, at a certain level, the cost of bikes does get to the ‘law of diminishing returns’ levels, but I do think that, if I was in the market for a plus sized carbon trail bike with huge versatility, it would be between this and possibly the Santa Cruz Hightower. I’ve not tried the Hightower, but the sheer fact that it offers a more ‘industry standard’ 148mm boost rear spacing means I would probably err towards that, rather than the Switchblade.
That said, I can’t form a proper opinion until I’ve had a blast on a Hightower. I’d love to feel the difference between the VPP and DW suspension designs and truly make my mind up, so I may get in touch with my local Santa Cruz dealer, Pedal & Spoke, very soon to make it happen, so stay tuned.
Pivot are making some fantastic bikes and they’re absolutely worth checking out if you’re looking for a high end bike with a proven pedigree. I very much enjoyed my ride on the Switchblade, I’m sure you wouldn’t be disappointed either.
www.pivotcycles.com

 

2018 Marin B-17 First Ride

I think the technical bods at Marin have been very busy with R&D. Rather than metal and carbon, I can’t help but think they’ve been experimenting with genetic engineering. Somehow, they’ve managed to mix a fluffy little kitten with a freight train and they’ve created something stunning; the 2018 B-17.
I was lucky enough to be at Swinley Forest recently on a solo ride and the pre-production B-17 was available. So, I switched my SR71 Blackbird for the all new heavy hitter, the B-17. Swinley Bike Hub had a few of the top of the range ‘three’ models and my word, do they look stunning! A raw finished aluminium frame housing a 120mm Rockshox super deluxe shock within their acclaimed MultiTrac platform, Vee Tire Co Crown Gem 2.8” tyres with gorgeously retro gum walls, Sram GX Eagle 12 speed drivetrain, SLX brakes, 2018 Rockshox Pikes with new charger damper, KS Lev dropper post and a whole host of other perfectly paired components.
All of this sits around boost spacing front and rear and 38mm internal diameter rims, leaving you feeling sturdier than Hulk Hogan sitting on Andre the Giants shoulders. Planted does not even begin to describe the feeling of the B-17.
I mean, for the love of all that is holy, look at it and tell me it doesn’t throw you back to the good old days of dial up internet, brick phones and global hypercolour t-shirts:
In case you can’t tell, I was won over by the looks and price of this bike as soon as I saw it. At a touch over £3k, it, like many other Marins, is superb value for money and like a Rogers DAB radio, manages to blend a mix of retro and modern together – again, engineering (genetic or otherwise) at its finest!
They’ve always been one of my favourite brands. I’ve owned 2 Mount Visions from 2008 and a 2010 Attack Trail, all with the beautiful quad link suspension design that worked flawlessly and my wife has the 2017 Hawk Hill, so they definitely hold a special place in my heart.
However, the past few years have seen Marin quite possibly reach the pinnacle of their designs to date. With the eye-catching Wolf Ridge, the ever-reliable Mount Vision and now the B-17, they’re winning the hearts and minds of mountain bikers worldwide.
Anyway, enough of the rose-tinted reflections and back to the bike. I’d already done 12 miles on my bike in the morning in some nice weather, so the legs were feeling ready for a tear up on the B-17. I headed out to the sweeping trails of the forest to hit some berms and gauge grip from the beefy plus tyres. I’d not been convinced of plus bikes before now, but I’m now absolutely sold on them. It was genuinely like being on rails, with confidence in the corners running at an all-time high. The Vee Tire Crown Gems easily hold their own against the competition and I felt more at home on these than the Maxxis Rekon or DHF plus tyre.
I tested a large frame and it was absolutely spot on. The ride felt compact despite a long toptube thanks to super-short 435mm chainstays, which gave it a positively aggressive stance that begged you to push the bike to its limits. The feel of the bike in general was sublime, with everything working in unision. Roots felt like twigs, braking bumps were a thing of the past and the ‘hummmmmmmmmmmm’ of the tyres when riding between trails kept me smiling all day. Even when the British Summer decided to do one and the rain came in.
Still, a bit of rain meant I got to sample the bike in some new conditions and I’m pleased to say that not once did the B-17 miss a beat. Whilst I was getting soaked (protip – if you have a waterproof jacket in the car, take the damn thing with you), the B-17 remained faithful and powered through newly developed ruts, mud, slop and anything else it was confronted with.
Although I only managed to get in another 12 miles on the B-17 before I resembled a prune and had to call it quits, I immediately felt like I belonged on this bike; a feat only managed by a few other bikes before. I cannot fault the B-17, nor can I fault Marin for what they’re doing; breaking boundaries and pushing limits. Other bike manufacturers take note; this is how you make a fun to ride, great to look at bike at an equally pleasant price.
If the ‘three’ is out of your budget, there are two further models to choose from, both with some great kit and colourways. The range starts from approximately £1600, so very much entry level contenders and, in my humble opinion, quite possibly a bike of the year contender.
If I had the spare funds, a B-17 three would one hundred percent be gracing my mancave. Sadly, a bathroom renovation is apparently my priority according to the better half (you can all booooo her if you want), so I can only hope that Marin find a spare one behind their R&D sofa that they simply don’t want anymore and feel kind enough to donate it…
Big thanks as always to the team at Swinley Bike Hub for being so accommodating and getting me on board this beauty of a bike at such short notice. They really do go above and beyond and prove that customer service and the independent bike shop is definitely not dead.
Stay tuned to the Marin website to see full information very soon and, if you have a spare £3k burning a hole in your pocket and you’re looking for plus sized perfection, you will absolutely not go wrong with the B-17. I genuinely couldn’t speak higher of this bike if I tried.
Until next time… Stay Stoked. Stay Stealth.
www.marinbikes.com
www.swinleybikehub.com

Fox Proframe helmet – first ride

Open face breathability. Full face protection. This is the tagline from Fox for their new Proframe helmet, launched recently. It’s hard to think that a full face lid would be anything other than a sweatbox for all day riding, so I wanted to try one out to see if that tagline rang true.
Sunday 23rd April 2017 saw the Fox Europe team embark on Swinley Forest, one of my local trail centres, on their Proframe World Tour. This was the perfect opportunity for riders like me to try out the new helmet and see what the fuss was about. Even better, they had Pierre-Edouard Ferry (Red Bull Rampage sender and damn nice guy) leading out rides, Russ Cosh from the Swinley Hub cooking up some mean burgers, the awesome Stuart, Joe and the team from Fox and the lovely Rachel (Stuarts other half), in attendance.
Before I go any further, go follow Rachel on Instagram for all things Fox, MTB for chicks and brilliant posts. Top marks too, to Tristan, owner of Swinley Bike Hub, for once again putting on a great event. The Swinley Enduro, the BBQ’s, night rides and all other events are always a brilliant laugh, check one out if you can!
A bearded goon and Pierre-Edouard Ferry – Top bloke and half decent on a bike, too!
I had a chat with the guys and picked up a Proframe in Medium in Moth Teal and the fit was perfect, like Goldilocks tucking into a bears porridge. If it’s not the right fit for you immediately, the helmet comes with a number of different cheek pads to get sizing just right.
I set off on a small solo ride to get some first thoughts and take some photos and WOW. I felt like I wasn’t wearing a helmet on the first trail, and the climb on the second trail usually has me warm in my current helmet (Bell Super 2R, which I usually run without the chin guard), but the Proframe kept me feeling fresh as a daisy.
It probably helps that the visor is fixed to allow for maximum airflow, but more on tech later.
Heading down blue 3 with the wind rushing through my hair and beard (the Proframe has a massive beard vent at the front…), I saw a mate of mine, Marius, taking photos so stopped for a chat and to get a banger shot – cheers Marius!
Photo – Marius Howard
After some more climbs (helter skelter, if you know Swinley), my head was still cool thanks to the 15 big bore intake vents and 9 exhaust vents placed perfectly across the helmet. After a few miles at a reasonable pace, my head was dry and I headed back to the trailhead to catch up with everybody and talk tech with Stuart, Country Manager for Fox GB. So, let me pass that tech talk to you.
Stuart (Front row, second left) on a recent night ride with the Swinley mob
Firstly, the Proframe comes in 8 colours, so there’s guaranteed to be one to suit you. Of course, I’d go with black, but after wearing the ‘Moth Teal’ colourway, I actually really liked it (just don’t tell anybody, ok)! Even with its ridiculously light weight (735 grams for the Medium), it’s fully downhill certified, so you could genuinely feel confident about taking on Fort William or Mont St Anne whilst rocking this lid. Even more so that it comes as standard with MIPS and also includes a ‘Varizorb’ liner, both of which help to spread the force of any impacts away from a central point on your head. Which is always nice.
One thing I was super impressed with, was the ‘Fidlock’ buckle; sometimes when wearing gloves, unbuckling your helmet can be a hassle. The Fidlock allows you to softly press a small button which releases the buckle in a split second. It’s just as easy to do up and, when buckled, it’s not going anywhere.. once again, keeping you feeling confident that the Proframe is going to keep you safe on the trails.
I don’t really do tech talk though, I prefer to focus on the feel on the trail and my personal thoughts, so here’s some more tech from the source and a promo vid:
It’s all fair and well going our for a solo mooch at a decent pace, but I met up with two of the Swinley Bike Hub race team; Michael Wilson and Aidan Burrill, both of whom are absolute weapons on a bike. So, I went for a proper little ride with them to get the sweat going. Even when trying to keep up with the big boys, I felt much cooler than if I was wearing my Super 2R, both in open and full face guises. Incredible stuff, Fox! Don’t get me wrong, I was still a sweaty mess at the end of the ride (damn my love of pizza), but a little less so I think, thanks to the Proframe.
Pricing is also very reasonable, considering the protection, weight, technology and looks (which, can I just say are stunning). At £215 rrp, it’s fantastic value in my opinion. Here’s a few shots to show the look of the Proframe both on and off the head:
Put simply, although I only tried this helmet for an hour or so, first impressions are verrrrryyyyy good. It allows you to climb like a goat and stay cool, yet smash the descents with the confidence of a ‘traditional’ downhill/full face helmet. Sometimes, trying to combine two things can go horribly wrong. Fox however, have created the PB&J of helmets; a delicious combination of open faced breathability, with the performance and confidence inspiring protection of a much heavier helmet.
Top marks for pushing the boundaries, I can see this being a huge hit on the trails across the globe. I’m actually in the market for a new helmet myself and this is now a serious contender. I’d love to have had a longer time demoing it, but I was short on time and to be able to even try before you buy is a wonderful thing!
Is it overkill for the trails you ride? I’d say no. It’s so light and there’s always the chance that even at your local trails you become complacent, so to be able to have the option to ride all day without overheating whilst knowing you’re protected is surely a win-win situation.
Available at all good Fox retailers, although I’d recommend you order yours through Swinley Bike Hub; it’s a great place and, considering Fox chose Swinley as a venue, surely that says a lot.
Cheers!
Ian @ Stealth Riders
www.foxracing.com
Note – This review is my own, I was not asked or paid to do this, I just wanted to give my honest thoughts in the hope that it may help you, fellow shredder. 

 

Mudhugger Shorty review

You’re the same as me I reckon. You’re always looking for the latest upgrade to your bike that’ll make you radder than Danny Hart, gnarlier than Kurt Sorge or rowdier than Olly Wilkins. You spend hours researching the latest tech, suspension models, wide rims and weight saving options. However, something that is often overlooked is one of the things that keeps your eyes on the prize. Goggles or glasses are important, but what really matters is a top-notch mudguard to keep the mud, dog eggs and other trail terrors at bay.
There are many mudguards available and I’ve been through a few, but for the last few years, I’ve been running a Mudhugger in one form or another. Initially I opted for the FR, the longer length guard that offers additional protection from the elements. However, more recently, mostly due to me throwing my bike in the back of the car and warping my FR version, I decided to slim down and try out their original guard, the Shorty; a ‘diet’ version in the Mudhugger range these days.
First up, the feel of the Mudhugger guards is solid. Although malleable, they feel a lot sturdier in comparison to other guards I’ve tried out. Thicker than your average guard and offering extra coverage, I’ve actually ditched wearing eye protection since fitting a Mudhugger (except for uplift days ‘cos you gotta look Enduro in ya gogs, brah).
A bit about the company. The Mudhugger is owned and operated by brothers Bruce and Jamie Gardiner who are top blokes and also happen to ride the same bike as me, the awesome Bird Cycleworks Aeris. In 2012, they were fed up of mud caked arses and brown eyes (erm..), so they got to work. Fast forward to today and they have a product that graces bikes of World Champions such as Loic Bruni and many other pro riders. Offering up 9 different types of hugger, plus a host of other goodies (air fresheners, helitape, neck warmers and much more), there’s a hugger to suit every bike. From boost to fatties and leftys, they’ve got you (and your eyes) covered. Check out their site right here.
Back to the Shorty in question. It comes with enough zipties to get you fitted (you may opt to double up the ties on the lower legs to keep it from moving if, like me, you remove your front wheel to put your bike in your car) and is ridiculously easy to fit. If you do need help, they’ve even made a sweet video to help you:
It’s impressive in weight at just 60g and measures 340mm in length, so is super light yet sturdy and offers exceptional coverage to boot. The Shorty also caters to all standard wheel sizes (whatever the hell ‘standard’ is these days), fitting 26″, 27.5″ and 29″ wheels. It sits close to the tyre (I run a 2.3″ Maxxis Shorty), but not close enough to cause any concern. Occasionally a small bit of debris may get caught up, leaving you with a ‘moto’ sounding tyre, but a quick bunny hop sorts that out. A lower profile tyre would alleviate this issue though.
On the trails, the Shorty doesn’t interfere with your riding and is barely noticeable except for the looks; I personally feel it adds an extra bit of spark to the bike thanks to the curvy shape, rather than others that I feel are a bit pointy and jagged.
Tried and tested on the new Bird Aeris 145 too.
Riding the trails of the UK, I’m regularly exposed to bad weather and the subsequent slopfest under tyre, so keeping things away from my face when nailing a trail at 20-30mph is essential. The Mudhugger Shorty has excelled at this time and time again. So much so, I keep mine on year round as you always run the risk of a damp spot under tree cover. It’s honestly incredible and the only time I’ve had mud in my eyes (remember I don’t ride with sunnies or goggles 90% of the time), is when I’ve hit a corner and the front wheel has been at an awkward angle. Still, one time from a hundred is absolutely good enough for me!
To sum it up, I genuinely cannot see me changing to any other form of mudguard in the future. The only time I’ll consider it is, if the Mudhugger bring out something better… but that’s a challenge in itself, as, like a Sunday roast or a cold beer, it’s hard to improve on perfection. Bottom line – get one, your eyeballs will thank you.
At just £18 with free delivery, it’s a steal and a surefire way to improve your riding on a budget. After all, the better you can see, the faster you can go, right? Words are great, but a picture paints a thousand of them:
Until next time, peace out.
Ian @ Stealth Riders
www.themudhugger.co.uk

Marin Hawk Hill review

Back in September 2016, the inaugural Swinley Forest Enduro took place. With a super vibe, chilled tunes, a hog roast and a wealth of race sponsors, it was a stunning day out with friends and new faces alike organised by the team at Swinley Bike Hub. You can read the Wideopenmag.co.uk report (written by yours truly) here.

Amongst the race sponsors on the day were Marin Bikes, who not only had branded marsh guards, pint glasses, prototype bikes and a tortoise on their stand, they were giving away a brand new 2017 Hawk Hill; their entry level 120mm full suspension trail bike. To win the competition, riders had to share pictures of the day on social media using #SwinleySpiritofEnduro, with the Marin team choosing the winner.

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As you may know already, I love a bit of Instagram, so I merrily took photos throughout the day, popping them up as and when, never thinking I’d be in with a chance of winning the bike. Guess what? I only went and won the bloody thing with the below picture!

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As I already have my bike, I gifted the Marin to my lovely wife Emily as her current bike was getting a bit dated (husband points right there!). After placing the order for a small frame with Tristan, owner of the Swinley Bike Hub, the day came to pick the bike up and I was massively impressed; a sturdy 6061 aluminium frame, 27.5” wheels with Schwalbe Hans Dampf 2.35″ tyres, 120mm of smooth travel courtesy of a RockShox Recon silver RL fork and X-Fusion O2 Pro R shock, and a full Shimano Deore 1×10 speed groupset come as standard.

To get a bike at this price with air suspension is refreshing to see and really does allow the rider to fine tune the bike to their weight and riding style; something that you can’t perfect with cheaper coil suspension. The rear suspension uses Marins own ‘MultiTrac’ system, which works in a very similar manner to their  ‘IsoTrac’ system found on their higher end models. Having not ridden a Marin since the Jon Whyte designed ‘Quad Link’ models a few years ago, I was pleasantly surprised with the feel of the Hawk Hill; it definitely feels more high end than the price tag would suggest.

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It’s worth noting that the bike doesn’t come tubeless, but at this price, I’d not expect it to anyway. However, a massive bonus is that the wheels and tyres are tubeless ready, so it’ll only take a few quid to convert and allow ultra low pressures and oodles of sweet, sweet grip. A minor thing to point out with a very cheap solution.

To help further keep the price down and appealing to a rider looking for their first full bouncer, Marin have used quite a few of their own brand parts including bars, saddle, post and cranks. All are fantastic quality and the attention to detail is evident, with colour matching the saddle to the frame being a nice little touch. For Emily though, as the saddle had a rather flat profile, it wasn’t suited to her. More on that below though.

 

Marin have put a lot of thought into the upgrading of this bike over time too. Along with the easy tubeless conversion, the front is already a 15mm maxle, with the rear a QR but allowing you the option to switch to 142x12mm if you feel inclined to do so. Also, there’s stealth dropper routing ready to go which is a welcome sight to see on such a great value bike. Add to this a short stem, wide bars and super comfy geometry and this is a machine that makes for an exceptional foray into the world of full suspension for both beginners and seasoned riders. Check out the full spec and details on the Marin site here. Their promo edit is here:

I’ve only ridden this bike a little bit as it’s too small for me, but Emily has been out a few times now (including the brilliant Swinley Christmas BBQ ride with mates Oscar and Nikki) and already I’ve seen improvement in her riding. Starting on the green trail, we quickly progressed to the blue. The ‘Stickler’ area of the blue trail really does help riders get to grips with a new bike and is great for learning how to ride berms and small features.

The Marin proved confidence inspiring and before we knew it, we were heading to the red trail to test her shiny new bike out! Emily was climbing faster than ever before and remarked that the brakes were really powerful, changing gears was super crisp and the bike was silent. Only minor things, but sometimes it’s the little things that make all the difference.

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The first thing Emily changed was the saddle, as mentioned above. This is a massively important part of remaining comfortable on a ride and she opted for a Fizik Vesta, which offers great comfort and a concave cutout that extends to the rear of the saddle to prevent any pressure points on sensitive areas.

Talking comfort, the Hawk Hill is a bike that offers buckets of it. With a relatively slack 67.5 degree head angle, it’s both a mile muncher and a trail centre shredder. With the right fitness, this would be a superb bike to take on an epic adventure ride such as the South Down Way. Similarly, you could easily take this to an Enduro event and have an absolute blast.

So far, Emily is having a great time getting more into mountain biking. This is no doubt thanks to her being on board her new Hawk Hill, so a MASSIVE thank you to Tristan Taylor, Swinley Bike Hub and Marin Bikes… it’s great to see such a high number of female shredders in the MTB world already, so to have another join the ranks is an awesome thing and I’m stoked to be able to share the trails with my wife. Here’s how it’s currently looking:

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First thoughts on the Hawk Hill is that it seriously punches above it’s price tag, climbs incredibly well and descends equally so. Thanks to the stiff chassis, great components and grippy tyres, this is a bike that will guarantee progression in your riding and will offer tons of grin inducing moments. It’s been a brilliant bike so far for someone new to both proper mountain biking and full suspension bikes and, because it offers so much upgrade potential, it’s a bike that will grow as the rider progresses. Overall, this is a superb bike that will keep Emily smiling for years to come and who knows, may even seen her claim a podium spot at the 2017 Swinduro!

The Hawk Hill can be picked up for an incredible £1350 and is available to demo and buy from Swinley Bike Hub, along with a host of other stunning Marin models.

Until next time, cheers,

Ian (and Emily) @ Stealth Riders

SBH

marin

Note – This is my own review and all opinions are mine. I was not paid or asked to do this, I just wanted to share my views in the hope it may help you out if you’re in the market for a new bike.

Bird Aeris One45 review

So I recently tested the new Bird Aeris One20 and the review is here. Once I handed that back, I was given the bigger, burlier brother, the One45 and went to the Surrey Hills to put it through its paces. Simply put, at the end of the day, I didn’t want to give this bike back.
Before I get too carried away, let’s talk about the bike. At 6’1” and 87kg, I currently ride a large original (now retro?) Aeris, but opted for the ML (medium long) version of the new bike. The reason for this is due to an increased top tube length (630mm) and wheelbase (1230mm), effectively sitting me in a similar position to my current ride. Measurements are below, these can also be found on the Bird website:
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The demo bike came with 150mm RockShox Yari forks and a metric Deluxe RT3 shock with 145mm travel. I ran the suspension at 30% and 20% sag respectively, opting for a slightly stiffer rear for the terrain I was heading to. Like the One20, it was equipped with SRAM GX 1×11 drivetrain and guide r brakes. The wheels were slightly wider DT Swiss M1700’s, with the same Maxxis DHF/HR2 combo I tried the day before. This time though, I ran the rear at 23psi and the front at 20psi. Again, a mighty Mudhugger Shorty was on standby to keep any mud and slop from my face.
The weight was around 30lbs, so a like for like with my current bike and this was evident the second I sat on the bike; I felt instantly at ease with it. The bike has been totally redesigned around metric sizing and boost spacing, but it felt familiar, which is a huge plus when you only have a day to form an opinion!
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It was another cold Winters day, so the ground was frozen with some iced over areas to contend with. I set out and after what is usually a brutal climb out of the Walking Bottom car park up a super steep 13-15% incline, I still had air in my lungs; this bike genuinely climbs like a hardtail with zero feeling of pedal bob… from then, I knew it was going to be a fun day out. I hit Proper Bo to get the measure of the bike and the power was instant. Snaking through the small turns and ruts, the small double and drop on this trail felt like nothing.
Due to it’s steep seat tube angle (440mm), the One45 felt long and slack when attacking the descents but put the saddle up for a killer climb and it shortens up, allowing you to really put the power down and stomp uphill in record time. It’s like Optimus Prime’s wet dream, a transformer of epic proportions.
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I figured it was time to try a bigger trail. Thick & Creamy on Pitch Hill had a hold over me this time last year with its 2 sizeable drops and a crazily steep, tight chute as the entrance. I’d nailed it a few months back, but on the One45, I breezed through and it genuinely made the drops there feel like I was hopping off a kerb. The landings were so smooth and the bike soaked up everything with more to give. Granted it’s not carbon, but when the One45 is released in March with its ultra-stiff chassis and tidy design (and bottle cage mounts!), it may have Nomads and Capras squirming a little uncomfortably in their seats.
Thick & Creamy done, I gave Thicker & Creamier a go next. Another crazy steep entrance gives way to loamy turns and fast bombholes. However, there was a monster puddle in one of these, which I tried riding around, only to eat dirt. After a nice soft landing and a little chuckle to myself, I was back up and finished the end of the run with its nice step up before leading out to the road and a nice climb back to the top.
The Surrey Hills is great, too, with an abundance of trails and friendly riders. I bumped into a film crew from Fly Creative and a guy called Phil, chatted to them for a while, then saw Joe Williams of Physio 1 to 1. Check him out here if you’re in need of a top class physio! Here’s a couple of close ups:
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Taking so many pictures, riding like a bat out of hell and laughing like a mental case made me hungry, so I set my sights for the Peaslake village store, via the renovated Captain Clunk. When I say renovated, I mean ruined. It’s been tamed down massively and wasn’t anywhere near as challenging as it once was. A huge shame, but there’s still a vast network of trails to keep every level of rider entertained.
Whilst I was tucking into a red velvet cupcake and slurping coffee to refuel courtesy of the ever lovely ladies at the store, a few Trek staffers rocked up on some of their 2017 demo models, so we had a chat about the Aeris and their Remedy and EX models before I set off for round 2 and my old favourites on Holmbury Hill; Yoghurt Pots and Barry knows best.
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Consistently, the One45 climbed like a trooper, making light work of the Radnor Road climb. With sore legs, I hammered through Yoghurts as best as I could and then flew down BKB as if I had sprouted wings. I did pick up some PR’s earlier in the day (including climbs), which is testament to the bike. The Surrey Hills is a place I’ve been riding for so long and riding this bike breathed new life into very familiar trails, rejuvenating my love for some that had become a little stale over the years.
Massive thanks to Bird for the demo. The One45 drops in March and you can pre-order yours here. As with the One20, a huge range of sizing and a fully custom bike builder means there will be an Aeris One45 for you. Colours are delightful too; lime green, the tangerine orange model I tested and my favourite of course; stealth black. Frame prices start from a wallet friendly £900, so this is set to be another outstanding value for money machine.
I absolutely love my current Aeris and I’m sure it’ll go on for a long time yet. However, when it’s time to change, the One45 will be at the top of my list. The One20 is superb, but from the second I slung my leg over the One45, I felt at home; one with nature and metal, with nothing but zen thoughts of shredding epic trails in my mind.
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I’ve been trying to pick out a flaw or a negative point, but after sleeping on it, I honestly have nothing bad to say about this bike. To sum it up, imagine if you will, that Hercules and Icarus had a baby. Their lovechild would be an Aeris One45. Immensely strong, stiff and solid, yet light as a feather when climbing and faster than me at an all you can eat buffet.
It’s a most welcome addition to their line up and is simply an outstanding successor to the Mk1 and Mk1.5 Aeris models.
The Aeris is dead; long live the Aeris.
Cheers,
Ian @ Stealth Riders
Note – This is my own review and all opinions are mine. I was not paid or asked to do this, I just wanted to share my views in the hope it may help you out if you’re in the market for a new bike. The ride I did can be seen on Relive right here. I’ve also included a video full of sketchy riding, crap angles and a little stack from my day out:
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Bird Aeris One20 review

My day job is in travel and January is always manic, so I decided to book 2 days off and ride bikes instead. Rather than ride mine, I thought I’d give the new Bird Aeris models a go and pop some first impressions up to help people that may be looking for a new bike.
Bird have redesigned their full suspension Aeris and now have 2 more curvy models based around metric shocks and boost spacing; the One20 and the One45.
I gave the guys at Bird a shout and before I knew it, I was picking up the new Aeris One20, Birds newly designed 130/120mm trail bike and was en-route to Swinley Forest, which I figured would make an excellent testing ground for a bike with this amount of travel. It was a damn cold but sunny day, sitting around minus one, so the ground was crisp with some damp spots on the more loamy sections. A perfect day to spend outside, rather than confined to an office. If you’ve not been to Swinley Forest yet, I’d highly recommend it for it’s all weather friendly trails and the laughs you’ll have at the hub with the team there.
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The model I tested was a large, which at 6’1”, was spot on. Kitted out with 130mm RockShox Pikes, their new metric Deluxe RT3 rear shock, SRAM GX 11 speed drive and Guide RS brakes and DT Swiss E1900 wheels with Maxxis Minion DHF front, High Roller 2 rear both running low pressures of around 18psi. Keeping the muck away is the ever reliable Mudhugger shorty. It was a setup similar to my current bike, except the new models now sport bottle cage mounts, making them super enduro!
My initial thought was that the weight was very low for an aluminium bike. I didn’t weigh it with scales, but was impressed with both that and the sleek new curves and frame design in general. Heading through the high sided berms of the blue runs at Swinley, immediately I could feel the bike gripping in the cold, icy conditions too. At times, it felt like I could get practically horizontal and still go lower.
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The bike is also long. Very long, with a top tube of 655mm on the large, offering a wheelbase of 1220mm! However, thanks to a steep seat tube, during the climbs it also felt compact which worked in my favour… it’s hard to explain, but it just works. You can check out the full measurements below:
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What impressed me most however, is when I got to the red sections and off piste areas. I figured I’d hit a few drops that I’d not usually attempt on a short travel bike, but it ate them up with ease. It’s a bike that definitely punches above its weight in terms of gravity riding; I didn’t feel like I had 120mm travel, that’s for sure. As somebody that can’t jump for shit, it also inspires confidence and after a few attempts, I was clearing the table on Babymaker like a (not so) pro.
The metric shock may have something to do with this. It felt a lot smoother and more progressive than my Monarch RT3 Debonair. Technical data isn’t my strong point, but I’m sure the Bird guys would be happy to explain ramp up and linear feels! A few close ups for you:
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Like a chainsaw or a scalpel, in the hands of the right person, this is one seriously fun piece of kit and I reckon it’s going to be a sure-fire hit. It’s a bike that is made for the likes of Swinley Forest, but I’m sure people with more talent than me will slay the black runs of Bike Park Wales on one of these! It’s already got a race winning pedigree too; Chris Doney rode one to victory in the Southern Enduro last year.
Its main competition in terms of UK brands will be the Whyte T-130 and the Cotic Flare, neither of which I’ve had the chance to try yet… I’ll look into that soon.
If you’re looking for a really fun trail bike at a great price, the Aeris One20 should definitely be on your demo list. There’s a huge amount of sizing, including a ‘medium long’, as well as a fully custom bike builder, so there will be one to suit you for sure. Prices start from an incredible £1681 and you can choose from Atomic Blue, Candy Orange or Tungsten Grey.
Check out the full range, sizing and pricing here.
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To sum it up, at the end of the day when dropping it off at Bird HQ, my legs were aching from pushing myself and climbing faster than ever before and I had a big smile from an epic day out on a stunning bike. It feels superb going up and descending and has a huge grin factor. I do think I’m personally more suited to a larger travel bike, having had a 160/140 Aeris for a while now, but the One20 is a bike that absolutely has its place in the market as a short travel trail destroyer.
However, although sad to give the One20 back, I was handed a One45 and had a date with the Surrey Hills the following day… you can read that review here.
Big thanks to the guys at Bird HQ for the demo bike and to Swinley Forest (and the ever awesome hubdudes) for the fantastic test ground.
Peace out for now,
Ian @ Stealth Riders
Note – This is my own review and all opinions are mine. I was not paid or asked to do this, I just wanted to share my views in the hope it may help you out if you’re in the market for a new bike. The ride I did can be seen on Relive right here.
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